Last edited by Fenrilar
Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

3 edition of Death, brain death, and ethics found in the catalog.

Death, brain death, and ethics

by Lamb, David

  • 363 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by Avebury in Aldershot, Hants, England, Brookfield, Vt .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Medical ethics.,
  • Death.,
  • Brain death.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 113-117) and indexes.

    StatementDavid Lamb.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsR725.5 .L34 1996
    The Physical Object
    Pagination120 p. ;
    Number of Pages120
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL1022786M
    ISBN 101859725066
    LC Control Number96085556

      When/if conflicts arise, such as family refusal of performing brain death protocol, or lack of acceptance of the concept of brain death, providers need to have the skills and knowledge to discuss these conflicts with the families in a culturally, religiously and ethically appropriate manner. Brain death is a controversial issue that is often difficult for families to understand or accept. Palliative care interventions can help families to accept the death. However, delaying pronouncement of brain death may be detrimental to the family and lead to financial, ethical, and legal complications, including the potential for insurance fraud.

    Thoughtfully and analytically surveys and evaluates the arguments for and against equating the death of a person with brain death. The ethical issues - both theoretical and practical - are explored Read more.   In this book, the author thoughtfully and analytically surveys and evaluates the arguments for and against equating the death of a person with brain death. The ethical issues-both theoretical and practical-are explored against a rich and comprehensive background of current medical thought and practice and the most recent legal reasoning and Author: Douglas N Walton.

    Even tho this book, Death: Beyond Whole-Brain Criteria, is a few decades old, the issues have still not been resolved. And new books along this line are definitely needed. If you would like to read other books about defining death, search the Internet for the following exact expression: "death- Reviews: 1.   It is time to revise the Uniform Determination of Death Act (UDDA) to assure a consistent nationwide approach to consent for brain death testing. Only two of 56 U.S. jurisdictions address the question in statute or regulation. Unfortunately, leaving this issue up to clinicians and the courts has led to considerable confusion and variability.


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Death, brain death, and ethics by Lamb, David Download PDF EPUB FB2

The book argues that ‘brain death’ can be precisely defined and that a biological concept of death such as ‘brain death’ can be philosophically well-grounded. It examines traditional criteria for death and various formulations of the concept of death in both medical literature and philosophical by: The book argues that ‘brain death’ can be precisely defined and that a biological concept of death such as ‘brain death’ can be philosophically well-grounded.

It examines traditional criteria for death and various formulations of the concept of death in both medical literature and philosophical texts. Death, Brain Death and Ethics Paperback – Febru by David Lamb (Author) › Visit Amazon's David Lamb Page.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. See search results for this author. Are you an author. Learn about Author Central. David Cited by: Death, brain death, and ethics.

Albany: State University of New York Press, © (OCoLC) Online version: Lamb, David, Death, brain death, and ethics. Albany: State University of New York Press, © (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication: Document Type: Book.

Death, Brain Death and Ethics articulates the case for a brain death standard, while presenting an informed viewpoint on what constitutes the end points of human life. Although the book is written from a philosophical standpoint, it raises fundamental questions regarding the meaning brain death life and death, and will interest lay-persons, lawyers, and.

But in fact, “brain death” is no different than any other sort of death: A brain-dead person is no longer alive. The term simply describes how the death was determined, said Laurence McCullough, a professor at the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

For more than Death years, in most brain death the world, the irreversible cessation of all brain function, more commonly known as brain death, has been accepted as a criterion of death.

Yet the philosophical basis on which this understanding of death was originally grounded has been undermined by the long-term maintenance of bodily functions in brain. Two cases involving “brain death” have received considerable public attention, including commentary by several well-known bioethicists.

In commenting on these cases the bioethicists have stated, in no uncertain terms, that an individual correctly diagnosed as “brain dead” is dead, pure and simple.

Contrary to appearances of being alive, in reality the “brain dead” individual is. Richard Maundrell revisits the definition of death in light of new research suggesting the possibility of consciousness after a diagnosis of brain death.

_____ In Septembera young Toronto woman, Taquisha McKitty, stopped breathing following an overdose of drugs.

She was resuscitated by first responders, but it became apparent in the days that followed. Ethics “Brain death” as a criterion for determining the death of a person is a social formulation, perhaps justifiable in the context of organ donation and transplantation.

It implies a notion of irreversibly lost personhood. The diagnosis uncovers cultural and religious diversity in a pluralistic society and challenges public trust in the. Death, Brain Death and Ethics (Avebury Series in Philosophy): Medicine & Health Science Books @ ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: pages ; 23 cm.

Contents: Death - concept and criteria; three formulations of brain death; the brain, the brainstem and the critical system; higher brain, whole brain and lower brain formulations; criteria for death; death - process or event?; brain death and personal identity; ethics and brain.

Death, brain death and ethics. [David Lamb] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library Book: All Authors / Contributors: David Lamb.

Find more information about: ISBN: OCLC Number: Description. The article is a critical commentary on Peter Singer’s thesis that the brain death definition should be replaced by a rule outlining the conditions permitting organ harvesting from patients who are biologically alive but are no longer persons.

Largely agreeing with the position, I. Death, brain death, and ethics. [David Lamb] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library Book: All Authors / Contributors: David Lamb.

Find more information about: ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes. Ethical Issues in Brain Death: Lessons Learned from High-Profile Recent Cases Alexander A. Kon, MD, FAAP, FCCM Chief, Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Medical Director, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Naval Medical Center San Diego Clinical Professor University of California San Diego School of Medicine.

Introduction. The declaration of death by neurological criteria is an accepted medical practice throughout most of the world 1 and yet both public and academic controversies persist. 2–5 The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the literature on brain death, focusing on clinical and ethical perspectives on the topic.

To provide context, the history and legal standards. Ethics, brain death, family care Introduction Brain death remains a controversial ethical issue. The controversy is reflected in the differ-ing state laws regarding this issue and even in a recent white paper by the President’s Coun-cil on Bioethics.1 Families often have a.

Inthe President's Bioethics Commission, in drafting a uniform determination of death act, outlined two definitions of death: irreversible cessation of circulatory and respiratory functions; and irreversible cessation of all functions of the entire brain, including the brain stem.

7 The new uniform determination of death law did not. Brain death (BD) is a distinct mode of death in pediatric intensive care units, accounting for 16–23% of deaths. Coma, absent brainstem reflexes, and apnea in a patient with acute irreversible neurological insult should alarm the attending physician to start the appropriate actions to establish or refute the diagnosis for BD.

BD diagnosis is clinical, starting with the preconditions that. A patient’s death makes it possible, even obligatory, to cease treatment and enables the harvesting of organs for transplantation to extend life for others. The clear line between life and death is important because physicians will not squander scarce medical resources or violate medical ethics by imposing treatment after the patient is dead.

In both cases Jahiu and Marlese have been declared brain dead. In both cases there is a huge controversy over whether their ‘life-support’ can be stopped. In both cases confusion and misunderstanding about brain death and life-support have led .Two popular and longstanding Evangelical texts on ethics accept brain death without any critical evaluation or hint of controversy (Davis,–; Feinberg and Feinberg,–).

“Indeed, the concept of brain death has met with little resistance among most proponents of Christian theology” (Miller and Truog,53).